Commentary

Jay Leno Was Wrong About West Virginia
The Intelligencer/Wheeling News-Register, Jan. 16, 2012
Jay Leno apparently holds to the comedic philosophy that when all else fails — and his “Tonight Show” has been one big fail after another for the past two years — just tell a West Virginia joke. He resorted to that stereotypical tactic again after West Virginia’s record-setting Orange Bowl victory.

The Illegal Immigrant Among Us
June 28, 2011
Jose Antonio Vargas, a Pulitzer-winning journalist, lied for more than a decade so he could stay in America and rise to glory in a profession that prides itself on truth-telling. Our Guatemalan friend Andres left the United States when he realized he was an illegal immigrant despite having a work visa. He’s the one worthy of admiration.

The Taxman Cometh, Again And Again
American Issues Project, July 9, 2009
A majority of voters either believed President Obama’s pledge not to raise taxes on those making less than $250,000 a year or didn’t care that he was inviting them to read his lips because they sent him to the White House and gave liberals control of Congress to boot. Now the taxman is in town, and he will be knocking on taxpayers’ doors again and again.

Fiscal Leaders Don’t Fire Inspectors General
American Issues Project, June 24, 2009
President Obama confirmed just how little he cares about making the federal government budget-conscious and efficient. He fired AmeriCorps inspector general Gerald Walpin for doing exactly what Obama says he wants.

The Era Of Gizmo Government
American Issues Project, June 11, 2009
Pork-barrel critics are quick to ridicule easy targets like the “bridge to nowhere” and the “highway to nowhere.” But high-tech projects masked by obscure industry jargon like “biometric enhancement,” “visual intelligence” and ” advanced photovoltaics” have been getting a pass because of the wow factor.

Stop Pushing The Tax Button
American Issues Project, May 28, 2009
Staples scored a marketing coup with its “easy button” television commercials that advertised the chain as the simplest way to restock office supplies. Unfortunately, government officials have applied that “easy” concept to their budget planning. Every time they face a shortfall, they hit the tax button — or convince voters to hit it for them.

No Net Tax Gains … Or No Net Taxes
American Issues Project, May 13, 2009
Fans of free markets and tax reform shouldn’t impulsively dismiss the Internet tax movement. Instead, they should consider embracing it as an opportunity to deter money-grubbing state and local officials from raiding the wallets of their constituents every time they get in a tight spot.

New On The Web: Politics As Usual
The New York Times, Dec. 1, 2006
Candidates across the country found plenty of “outsiders” in the blogosphere ready and willing to move inside their campaigns this year. They hired some bloggers to blog and paid others consulting fees for Internet strategy advice or more traditional campaign tasks like opposition research.

Journalists vs. Bloggers
Beltway Blogroll, July 8, 2005
Bloggers are like inspectors general, the independent watchdogs of government. Just as IGs are not part of the agencies they oversee, bloggers are neither part of government nor journalism, but they keep a wary and watchful eye on both. And in so doing they provide a valuable check against the arrogance, inadequacies and abuses of all four estates.

Where The Weather Is ‘Fine As Frog’s Hair’
Prince William Journal, Jan. 28, 1998
The next time Washington’s wacky weathermen predict a devastating winter storm, I hope the education leaders in Prince William County will step inside the box of Grandpa Tumblebug for just a moment. If they view the world through the lens of a bygone era, perhaps they won’t rush to judgment in closing schools. And perhaps they will see, as I have, that life inside the box is just fine — or as Grandpa Tumblebug would say, “fine as frog’s hair.”

A Warning To Cyber Journalists
IntellectualCapital.com, Dec. 18, 1997
Remember that the basic rules of news-gathering apply equally in media both new and old. I learned that lesson the hard way by quoting Wayne McGuire, a random online source, without first exploring his Internet reputation, and I got burned. Now I know that journalists need to be wary as we venture into cyberspace.

 

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