Discoverability: How To Get Noticed In A Market Overflowing With Apps

Discoverability White PaperThis is an excerpt of a white paper I wrote for The Application Developers Alliance.

If an app drops in the store and no one is around to see it, does it make a profit? The answer is no, and therein lies one of the major challenges facing application developers today.

Developers can make the most innovative app of the year or perhaps the decade, but if consumers cannot find it because of marketing obstacles, all of the engineering prowess will be for naught. What good is an angry bird without gamers to fling it from a slingshot or an Instagram without amateur photographers to capture nostalgic memories and share them?

Discoverability matters. It is as central to successful app ventures as the creative genius behind great apps. This paper identifies the challenges that developers and companies face in getting their apps before the right audiences, explores the current options available to do so and proposes solutions for optimizing discoverability.

The discoverability challenge
The app marketplace is immense. The virtual shelves in the major app stores are flush with about 1.5 million products, with more on the way every day. The download data is even more intimidating to developers hoping to be discovered. Consumers downloaded more than 40 billion apps between 2008 and mid-2012, but experts estimate that half of the business goes to only 0.1 percent of the available apps.

When the analytics provider Distimo released new data about apps in December, it rightly concluded that the exploding growth in the marketplace makes it more difficult for new developers to have their work discovered. Last July, the new Apptrace tool found that 400,000 of the then-650,000 iOS apps were “zombies” that had not been downloaded even once.

But even overcoming the download hurdle does not ensure success. While nearly 1 billion apps get added to devices every month, one in four of them are never used again.

The challenge also is daunting because consumers head primarily to overstocked app stores to shop. David Gill, vice president of emerging media at Nielsen, said his firm’s research found that 53 percent of app shoppers learn about products in app stores, which favor existing apps that have been installed often and recently over new apps.Add to that reality the short attention span of app consumers — they typically spend just three to 10 minutes shopping for each product — and it’s clear that guiding consumers to any given app can be like drawing them a map to a needle in a haystack.

“Consumers have a hard time finding good apps,” Appsfire co-founder Ouriel Ohayon wrote last year at GigaOm. “But, paradoxically, they don’t care enough to read reviews, compare apps or even search for apps. On mobile people are lazy.”

Read the full paper in PDF format.

Beware The Allure Of Shale ‘Mailbox Money’

Originally published at EagleFordForum and GoHaynesvilleShale
Attorney Spotlight: Ben Elmore
By K. Daniel Glover

If a land man calls with an offer of “mailbox money” for the mineral rights on your property, read closely before signing on the dotted line. If you don’t, oil and gas lawyer Ben Elmore said the words above it may come back to haunt you.

Mailbox money is a slang term of the shale era. “You wake up one day and you get a call from a land man” promising $1,000 an acre and a 20 percent royalty on oil and gas production from your property, said Elmore, an attorney in the industry for 13 years who now works at WattBeckworth in Houston. “You don’t have to do anything if you don’t want to, and every month a check will come.”

A few years ago in Texas, he said, the average mineral owner was a 65-year-old widow – the kind of people who could use the money. But the fine print they didn’t read in their royalty deals back then may be making them miserable now.

“It’s a bad attitude to have,” Elmore said of people who sign for quick cash. “Mineral owners need to educate themselves about what they own. They need to educate themselves about the industry and how it works.”

Elmore, whose clients include both landowners and oil and gas companies, said understanding the law in Texas before signing is even more important now because the government is making it harder to bring lawsuits after the fact.

“They are streamlining the litigation process in the oil and gas context much like they have in the tort context,” he said, and mineral owners are feeling the brunt of it.

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A Law Practice Built On ‘All Things Marcellus’

Originally published at GoMarcellusShale
By K. Daniel Glover

For Pennsylvania attorney Douglas Clark, the Marcellus Shale is a family matter. His first clients in the oil and gas space were his in-laws and their neighbors in Wayne County, and he has built an entire business around representing rural landowners in the Keystone State who remind him of his parents and grandparents.

“It’s been a gift to represent them,” Clark told GoMarcellusShale in a telephone interview. “It’s unbelievably rewarding to work with these people and get them the benefits” of living on resource-rich land.

Clark, who also hosts the radio program “All Things Marcellus” on WTRW in Scranton, Pa., never planned to get into the shale legal business. After earning his law degree from the University of Akron in Ohio, he moved to northeastern Pennsylvania to practice civil defense law. Clark later worked for the Lackawanna County Public Defenders Office and then started his own firm, taking on a mix of cases.

But after representing his in-laws and neighbors for several months in 2007-2008, Clark sensed landowners were at a disadvantage in negotiating with oil and gas companies. Some landowners were signing leases for bonuses of $100 an acre, while others were getting as much as $750. This was before the boom ultimately drove the market price to $5,750 bonuses and royalties of 20-plus percent.

Clark believed he could help. He bought advertising space in the local PennySaver publication and was off to the shale leasing races. “It just took off,” he said of landowners lining up for expert advice.

Years later, Clark is still going strong as a solo attorney for landowners. He tackles well-site, storage and pipeline agreements across the state. Lately he is handling more royalty payments and estate plans. The latter includes issues such as transferring property and ensuring that gas companies calculate royalties appropriately.

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Your Friendly Neighborhood Oil And Gas Lawyer

Originally published at EagleFordForum and GoHaynesvilleShale
By K. Daniel Glover

Years ago in Burleson, Texas, a company eager to extract natural gas from the Barnett Shale entered negotiations with property owners who were just as eager to profit from the minerals beneath their suburban development.

For a while, the talks favored the neighborhood association. The company agreed in principle to pay bonuses of $27,200 an acre and royalties of 25.25 percent. But with more than 1,000 owners in the neighborhood association, progress was slow. The recession hit in October 2008, and in one day, the company dropped its offer to $5,000 an acre and 25 percent royalties.

The neighbors cried foul, but the company insisted that no firm deal had been signed. The dispute wasn’t settled for 1 1/2 years.

The case sticks in the mind of Fort Worth attorney Eric Camp because such “rooftop leasing” is becoming more common as shale plays like Eagle Ford and Haynesville emerge across America. Oil and gas operators learned to protect their interests, Camp said, but property owners don’t tend to follow legal news like corporate lawyers. As a result, property owners are more likely to be burned now.

“Nothing pains me more than watching groups in other parts of the country making the same mistakes,” Camp said.

Yet cases like the one involving the “Central Burleson Holdouts” are precisely why Camp chose oil and gas as his legal specialty. “It’s what I’m passionate about, what I enjoy, and so it’s easier to get motivated to go to work every day,” he said.

Camp chose the field after clerking for an East Texas law firm while at Southern Methodist University in Dallas. “After that first summer, I fell in love with the business and the clients,” he said. “… You’d have no idea they were millionaires – just really hard workers and entrepreneurial.”

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Sitting On Top Of The Shale World

Originally published at GoMarcellusShale
By K. Daniel Glover

Douglas Berkley Jr. was laboring in relative online marketing obscurity for a Pittsburgh newspaper when he discovered his passion for the shale business. Now he works for a company that is part of the shale space, and he runs a budding network of social media sites about it.

“I love everything about the industry,” Berkley told GoMarcellusShale. “I feel like I’m doing the country, the world, this area a service.”

Berkley is the marketing director at Somerset Regional Water Resources, a company that offers water and well-site support services and owes its existence to the Marcellus Shale. He has been at SRWR for two years, having transitioned into the shale business two years before that.

Berkley’s interest in the industry started as he read article after article about the shale boom while working at the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. “You could see that there was something big coming,” he said, so Berkley pursued and landed a job at a shale-related startup.

He also has personal connections to shale: Although no drilling is occurring there, Berkley’s family owns land near the Marcellus region, and his hometown of Somerset, Pa., has benefited from that shale play.

The biggest benefit is jobs that pay enough to support families. This includes jobs for truck drivers, in front offices and in business development, which is one of Berkley’s responsibilities at SWSR.
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The Essential Guide To Pinterest

With the interest in Pinterest at a fever pitch, brands around the globe see the virtual bulletin board as a new social forum for connecting with their fans. But first brands need to make sense of Pinterest. The best way to start is by downloading “The Essential Guide To Pinterest,” a brief storytelling guide to this hot social network.

If a picture is worth a thousand words, Pinterest is a gold vein just waiting to be mined by brands. The network lets users “pin” images and videos from across the Web and organize them into themes that tell stories. The Pinterest interface is simple, and it offers boundless opportunities for companies to communicate their unique brand narratives in visual form.

Take That Trash Off My Wall!

Published in The Crime Report, Center on Media Crime and Justice
By K. Daniel Glover

David Oliver reached his social media breaking point last month.

As chief of the Brimfield, Ohio police department, Oliver is used to vulgar tirades against the police, especially from criminals and the company they keep. But he won’t tolerate such nastiness on the department’s Facebook page.

Hosting the page hasn’t presented many problems for Oliver in the year since it has been online. The department has deleted only three posts and banned four users. But two of the department’s posts on Jan. 23, one of them being a picture from a methamphetamine lab, triggered a flurry of foul language and personal attacks against officers.

Oliver deleted the offending content and then laid down the social media law.

“This is a police department [Facebook] page,” he wrote. “I am the chief here, which means I take responsibility for the entire content. … If you get offended because a ‘friend’ gets arrested, tough luck. Get new friends. Whatever you do, it will not involve bashing officers, me or the community on this page. It will not involve incoherent swearing.”

Oliver’s post earned nearly 300 “likes” and sparked 70 comments, far more engagement than usual on the page.

Most people cheered him for taking a hard line. But the status update also revealed a key concern facing police departments across America as they get more social: how to balance the community benefits of public interaction with the risks of creating an open, public forum.

“That’s the biggest challenge that most of us face,” said Sgt. Steve Hauck, who administers the social media channels for Utica, N.Y., police department. “There’s a fine line between free speech and vulgarity and what’s offensive. It’s always a judgment thing.”
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Jay Leno Was Wrong About West Virginia

Published in The Intelligencer/Wheeling News-Register
By K. Daniel Glover

For one magnificent moment after the Orange Bowl on Jan. 4, West Virginia University and the entire state of West Virginia were the talk of America. Sports fans were in awe of the Mountaineers, who set record after record in one of the greatest football games in college history.

We West Virginians should have known the hillbilly bashers wouldn’t let us bask in the glory for long, and sure enough, the predictable slam came less than 24 hours after the final whistle.

“And West Virginia beat Clemson in the Orange Bowl last night by a score of 70-33,” Jay Leno said in his “Tonight Show” monologue the day after the game. “West Virginia scored 70 points? Huh, West Virginia? They don’t score that high on their SATs.”

Leno apparently holds to the comedic philosophy that when all else fails — and the “Tonight Show” has been one big fail after another for the past two years — just tell a West Virginia joke.
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Book Review: ‘Digital Assassination’

Originally published at The Washington Times
Ghostwritten by K. Daniel Glover

The Internet is a boundless universe of information and connections that fuels the economy, enhances world culture and fosters democracy. But it also is home to digital assassins who lurk undetected and lob verbal, visual and technological grenades to ruin reputations — and enlist others via social media to achieve their evil ends more quickly.

That’s the ugly reality of online life as painted by Richard Torrenzano and Mark Davis in their new book, “Digital Assassination: Protecting Your Reputation, Brand or Business Against Online Attacks.” It’s a largely accurate portrayal — one that brands, businesspeople and public officials must take seriously if they want to thrive in today’s digital age.

Torrenzano and Davis at times go overboard in their rhetoric, particularly when it comes to blogs and social media. They also give too much credit to journalists for having kept character assassination in check during the 20th century. The chapter on “truth remix,” for example, is based in part on the prejudicial and flawed premise that “traditional media has been replaced by a blogosphere that creates falsities out of truth in order to compete for ratings and clicks.”

But the authors are not Luddites. They repeatedly emphasize that we humans are the problem and that modern technology has merely increased our capacity for lies, deceit and uncommon cruelty motivated by greed, jealousy and other character flaws. They identify parallels between character attacks of the low-tech past and the high-tech present to prove the point.

“This power of the new digital assassin to destroy is as powerful as YouTube but as old as civilization,” Torrenzano and Davis write. Their aim is to illustrate the depth, reach and speed of that amplified power and to teach people how to fight back.

Read the full review at The Washington Times.

The Social Customer Is Always Right

Originally published on the David All Group’s social marketing blog
By K. Daniel Glover

One evening last month, we started getting robocall after robocall from our insurance company on our home telephone. I tolerated a few of those interruptions from Allstate before I decided to take action. But what could I possibly do to halt recorded phone calls?

Then it hit me: Tweet!

So I did. I sent a couple of pointed but friendly tweets to @Allstatenews, specifically calling out Guy Hill, the executive vice president whose recorded voice kept disturbing our family time, and I included a link to Hill’s bio so the Twitter manager would know he was a real Allstate person.

Allstate promptly replied and the robocalls stopped. Even better, Hill sent me (and other customers) an apologetic note by snail mail a few days later and included a $25 gift card. “This is not typical of how Allstate operates, and we are taking the necessary steps to help ensure mistakes like this will not happen in the future,” the letter said.

My experience proves that the cardinal rule of commerce — the customer is always right — has never been more true than in today’s social media era.

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